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Six ways of looking at a piano
Chermayeff & Geismar Collection: Ninth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition folder, 1993.
June 01, 2014

Six ways of looking at a piano

By: bethkleber

Ivan Chermayeff frequently uses collage and collections to create texture and dimensionality, continually exploring modernist ideas about bringing process to the forefront. He produced this package of brochures for the Ninth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition in 1993. The piano abstractions are rendered in the form of his trademark torn paper collages – each is playful but instantly recognizable.

Graphic design of an abstract piano made with black, white and yellow paper against a white background. At the top is "Van Cliburn International Piano Competition History" in black bold text.

 
Chermayeff & Geismar Collection: Ninth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, 1993.

Graphic design of an abstract piano made with black, white and blue paper against a white background. At the top is "Van Cliburn International Piano Competition" in black bold text.

 
Chermayeff & Geismar Collection: Ninth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, 1993.

Graphic design of an abstract piano made with black, white and red paper against a white background. At the top is "Ninth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition" in black bold text.

 
Chermayeff & Geismar Collection: Ninth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, 1993.

Graphic design of an abstract piano made with black, white and green paper against a white background. At the top is "Ninth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition" in black bold text.

 
Chermayeff & Geismar Collection: Ninth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, 1993.

Graphic design of an abstract piano made with black, white and blue paper against a white background. At the top is "Ninth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition" in black bold text.

 
Chermayeff & Geismar Collection: Ninth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, 1993.

In 2009, Chermayeff designed the poster for the thirteenth competition, incorporating the work of his old Yale instructor, Josef Albers.

This post also appears on our Picturebox blog.