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The Container List Blog

January 13, 2012

Brushes with history

Another example of paintbrushes (standing in for the artist) combined with another object (here, amid or as the hammers on a typewriter) follows the one we featured last week. The poster this detail is from originally was made to promote a panel discussion between the artists Alice Aycock, Alex Katz, and Lucio Pozzi with critics Lawrence Alloway, Hilton Kramer and moderator Donald Kuspit on the relationship between the artist and critic.

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September 06, 2011

Bob + Joan

Bob Dylan’s brief relationship with Joan Baez was exhaustively documented, but we get interested when that affair highlighted the work of Push Pin Studios. In 1964, Dylan and Baez were photographed at Newark Airport in front of Seymour Chwast’s poster for Booth’s Gin: an incongruous, but not surprising, image of two icons flanking a countercultural message from a corporate advertiser.

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May 24, 2011

Stop the presses

Container List is on Twitter! Follow us for new post alerts as well as anything else we find that we think may appeal to you, beloved readers.

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March 31, 2011

McMullan at NYPL

Go see James McMullan’s Lincoln Center Theater posters at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

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September 09, 2010

Turning point

More from George Tscherny: his design on the poster for the U.S. exhibition at the troubled Milan Triennale of 1968. In those days, the event served as a major convergence point for conversation and debate within the design community.

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June 14, 2010

Ring leaders

If Chermayeff & Geismar could be said to have one particular speciality, it would probably be the knack for distilling complex organizational systems into extremely reduced graphic ideas: their calling card in this respect was the Symbol Signs project. But this poster for Interactive Data Corporation, with its monochrome figuration for a symposium, also falls neatly into the category (along with work for Xerox). Click through for the full page.

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February 09, 2010

Missed connections

You were the cute bearded guy on the F train this morning. I was the somewhat pallid but classically beautiful girl. I thought we were a good match but it was as though we were pulled apart by powerful ropes. Want to have coffee sometime?

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September 24, 2009

Chermayeff & Geismar for Pan Am

We have written on Tscherny’s artwork and modular displays for Pan Am. And now we’ve also uploaded more of C&G’s posters in the series (in our Flickr).

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August 07, 2009

Twen at the Visual Arts Gallery

Milton Glaser designed this poster for an exhibition at the Visual Arts Gallery in late 1965, organized by then Visual Arts Gallery director Shirley Glaser. Twen, a West German magazine for “people in their twenties: from 15 to 30,” was wildly influential in design circles worldwide—with a grid system composed of twelve small modules combined in an internally regular but widely varying page layouts, and liberal full-bleed spreads photographed by Art Kane, Will McBride, Irving Penn, Richard Avedon and others (and illustrations by Heinz Edelmann). It introduced many design students to Willy Fleckhaus, the magazine’s art director and sometime editor, who became famous for his virtuosic combination of close-set typography and tightly-cropped images. The rigid geometry of this poster, though not usually associated with Glaser, was a mode he employed often for SVA exhibition posters (more can be seen here and here). Though the graphic austerity is a contrast to his earlier work, the underlying expression of concepts through tactile visual representation is, I think, unmistakable Glaser.

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June 22, 2009

Script pattern by Ivan Chermayeff

Ivan Chermayeff designed this poster for AIGA’s “Color” exhibition in 1974, which collected work by artists, photographers and designers. Tightly flowing script creates a pattern made out of textual gibberish, where exaggerated descenders are punctuated at intervals with large blobs of ink. Click through for the whole image, with Chermayeff’s colorful signature.

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May 05, 2009

Mom always said…

The best translation I can come up with is “Only so!” which could be completely wrong. In any case, surely the image in this poster from the World Health Organization speaks for itself.

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April 07, 2009

Tony Palladino’s Guide to Life

Here’s a 1957 poster by Tony Palladino. Substitute ’09 for ’57 and it still works. Click here for the full image.

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January 29, 2009

For the love of Pee-Wee

Here’s a 1981 print from highly influential graphic artist (and longtime SVA instructor) Gary Panter advertising Paul Reubens’ Pee-Wee stage show in Los Angeles. The show was the springboard for Reubens’ feature film, Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, and later his acclaimed series, Pee-Wee’s Playhouse. Panter was the head set designer for the TV show and this early poster displays his trademark jagged lines and surreal sensibility. Now scream real loud when you hear the secret word…

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January 16, 2009

Inspiration: XTC and Milton Glaser

XTC’s Andy Partridge readily admits to using Milton Glaser’s 1966 poster for radio station WOR as the inspiration for the cover art for XTC’s 1989 album Oranges and Lemons. He has also professed his love of the work of Yellow Submarine art director and designer Heinz Edelmann, who is also a new addition to the archives — sneak peek to come!

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