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The Container List Blog

August 01, 2014

All together now

Shades of Yellow Submarine in Gian Carlo Menotti’s sci-fi opera for children Help, Help, The Globolinks!

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March 21, 2014

Childcraft

In 1970, Childcraft Education Corp. turned to Milton Glaser to design their flagship store at 150 E. 58th Street.

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September 27, 2013

Kid stuff

We looked at some of Edelmann’s political posters for the West German radio station WDR back in June. But there was also a lighter side to his collaboration with the broadcaster.

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March 25, 2013

Wonder Magazine, 1962

Wonder was the product of Henry Wolf’s class, Making a Magazine, at the School of Visual Arts. Conceived, designed, and written over the course of the Fall 1961 and Spring 1962 semesters, this one-off children’s magazine communicated with its audience in an exuberantly playful manner that never condescended. And it’s certainly the coolest-looking kids magazine I’ve ever seen. Wolf’s students included William Ingraham, Walter Bernard, Sullivan Ashby, Robert Giusti, Herbert Migdoll, Shirley Glaser, David November, Antonio Macchia, and Henry Markowitz.

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August 14, 2009

The Pancake King

In 1971, Phyllis La Farge and Seymour Chwast collaborated on the children’s book The Pancake King, which described the rapid ascent of a young master of the griddle pan. It spoke of the joy of breakfast, the perils of fame, the importance of family and of maple syrup. More spreads from The Pancake King are viewable on Flickr (thanks to Norman Hathaway), and show Chwast’s dexterous use of scale and bleed between spreads, and tidily-set Bodoni. The book was included in AIGA’s Fifty Books of the Year.

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April 03, 2009

P22 Type Foundry, Toy Box extras

The P22 Type Foundry, based in Buffalo, New York, packaged a typeface called Toy Box (originally named Child’s Play) with a set of extra glyphs including a collection of animal line-drawings based on children’s drawings. Commissioned by the London Transport Museum for a children’s exhibition in 1996, it was digitized by P22 founder Richard Kegler, with Michael Want, Mariah Kegler, Kevin Kegler, and Jennifer Kirwin-Want. Steven Heller included it in his book as an example of vernacular type.

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