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September 29, 2013

First Look: James McMullan

This summer we received a great donation from illustrator, poster designer and long-time SVA faculty member James McMullan.

First Look: James McMullan Continue Reading Read more
September 20, 2013

Future games

“Man in Control?” at Expo 67.

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September 14, 2013

Fifteen years of heartache and aggravation

In 1969, the Mead Library of Ideas presented an exhibition of the work of Push Pin Studios, sharing the design and illustration of its many current and former members.

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August 28, 2013

Atomic-age publication design

Comment was a promotional periodical produced by consortium of printers in the early sixties. Issue 200 included contributions from Saul Bass, Will Burtin, and Henry Wolf.

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August 12, 2013

Desk set

Chermayeff & Geismar’s promotional work for General Fireproofing’s steel office furniture neatly represents how they adapted their dominant styles to suit the needs of their corporate clients.

Desk set Continue Reading Read more
August 12, 2013

Concrete Poetry

Milton Glaser tips his hat to French poet, playwright, and critic Guillaume Apollinaire.

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July 30, 2013

Allan Kaprow’s Words

Another lovely artifact appeared in the Archive unexpectedly last week: Allan Kaprow’s Words, from 1962.

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July 20, 2013

Inside the Big Apple

One of the main attractions of the archive as a research tool is as a document of artistic process. (The effect of the overwriting of drafts by computers is a subject I have written about elsewhere.) There were several stages to Milton Glaser’s development of a poster for the Visual Arts Gallery exhibition “Inside the Big Apple” (1968) — the above shows his collage of different versions of the figuration, which arrangement ended up contributing the composition that he used in the final version (other versions and the final poster follow).

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July 16, 2013

Milton Glaser’s geometries

Milton Glaser is closely associated with a visual style emphasizing expressive illustrations and resonant cultural symbols, but revisiting different periods in his career one is reminded that he was constantly developing new approaches, and in the Glaser Collection one can find an astonishingly wide range of approaches to design problems.

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July 15, 2013

SVA Continuing Education courses in the ’60s

During the 1960s, SVA published a series of course announcements advertising the practical aspects of its evening classes. The text was often dry but the graphics were playful and eye-catching. Here, having some fun with type, are Ivan Chermayeff and Tony Palladino. Chermayeff and Bob Gill are after the jump.

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June 07, 2013

I can’t see my flag anymore

This detail from an anti-Vietnam war poster is represented only on a slide in the Tony Palladino collection. In serif text above the image, the original includes the complaint “I can’t see my flag anymore”—which has some of the same arch plainness or indirection of Chwast’s anti-war End Bad Breath poster of two years prior. Here’s another of various flags by Palladino, one graphic symbol whose permutations he remained fascinated by throughout his career. Despite its relative lack of exposure today, it is one of two Palladino posters in the Library of Congress.

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May 25, 2013

Pepsi Generation

The design firm of Brownjohn, Chermayeff & Geismar established their reputation for brilliant corporate identity work with one of their earliest clients, Pepsi-Cola.

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May 17, 2013

Dusty and the Duke

Milton Glaser illustrates the stark contrast between two film stars of 1969 — Dustin Hoffman and John Wayne.

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May 07, 2013

On your toes

Duane Michals photographed George Balanchine for Show magazine.

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April 23, 2013

The Sound of…

Milton Glaser’s early album covers express his understanding of the ineffable qualities of music.

The Sound of… Continue Reading Read more
April 15, 2013

Everyday is like Sunday

Milton Glaser’s take on Seurat.

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April 13, 2013

My ever changing moods

Well before the boom of direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising, highly adventurous drug advertising was aimed almost exclusively at physicians.

My ever changing moods Continue Reading Read more
April 01, 2013

Eat your peas & carrots

Westvaco’s not-so-generic paper promotion.

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March 31, 2013

The furniture people of Stanley VanDerBeek

Stan VanDerBeek (1927-1984) was best known as an experimental filmmaker but he was also a gifted painter and sculptor. This undated issue of the Push Pin Graphic features photographs of VanDerBeek’s whimsical creations.

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March 25, 2013

Wonder Magazine, 1962

Wonder was the product of Henry Wolf’s class, Making a Magazine, at the School of Visual Arts. Conceived, designed, and written over the course of the Fall 1961 and Spring 1962 semesters, this one-off children’s magazine communicated with its audience in an exuberantly playful manner that never condescended. And it’s certainly the coolest-looking kids magazine I’ve ever seen. Wolf’s students included William Ingraham, Walter Bernard, Sullivan Ashby, Robert Giusti, Herbert Migdoll, Shirley Glaser, David November, Antonio Macchia, and Henry Markowitz.

Wonder Magazine, 1962 Continue Reading Read more
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